State Violence in Mexico, as in the Philippines: Student leaders hold candle lighting to protest murder of 43 Mexican activist students, teachers

November 14, 2014

By NUSP
Photos of the murdered 43 activist students and teachers in Mexico who disappeared after clashes with the police in Iguala, Guerrero state on September 26, 2014.

Photos of the murdered 43 activist students and teachers in Mexico who disappeared after clashes with the police in Iguala, Guerrero state on September 26, 2014. Image by Reuters

The National Union of Students of the Philippines (NUSP) led the more than 200 student delegates of REV UP Philippine Student Summit in a candle lighting activity that laments and seeks justice for the murder of missing 43 students and teachers in Mexico. The said students and teachers were against organized crime and corruption perpetuated by the despotic government of Mexico.

The missing student activists are well known movers and demonstrators against the corrupt system of the Mexican ruling class and the reactionary government. The 43 activists “disappeared” after a protest against hiring discrimination.

“A government that resorts to fascism is an anxious, insecure and undemocratic government deaf to people’s legitimate demands and calls. Mexico and the Philippines have a long account of politics of impunity and violence against those who are critical and progressive,” says Sarah Elago, NUSP National President.

The history of violence and government corruption is not new in Mexico and is not far from the Philippine experience. As a matter of fact, at least 20,000 people in Mexico have gone missing since 2006 and almost 100,000 people have died in the past seven years due to organized crime.

While in the Philippines human rights group KARAPATAN has monitored state fascism perpetuated by the BS Aquino government: 204 extrajudicial killings, 21 enforced disappearances, 65,712 threat/harassment and intimidation, 141,490 cases of use of schools, medical, religious and other public places for military purposes, and 9,929 cases of restriction or violent dispersal of mass actions, public assemblies and gatherings, among others.

Fascism knows no race or country. The Philippines and Mexico share a common history of colonialism (Spanish and American), dictatorship, and a collective struggle by the people.

The student union is one with the growing call of the people of Mexico and the rest of the world to end the culture of impunity and in upholding the democratic rights of the student and the people for a just and free society.

NUSP, together with other student and youth formations, led the commemoration of Student Rights Week and International Students Day via the REV UP Philippines Student Summit 2014, November 14 at the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman. More than 200 student leaders and campus journalists attended the event launched to emphasize the historic role of student involvement and student mass movement in the fight for genuine social transformation.###

Reference: JC Sibayan, NUSP Media Liaison Officer, REV UP Philippines Coordinator, 0905-3588288